Make your own free website on Tripod.com

FRESH OFF THE PRESS!

CONTROLLING WATER ON THE BORDER: THE AMERICAN CANAL, INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, EL PASO, TEXAS (November 1999)

To obtain this report, send $15.00 to Dos Rios Consultants, Inc., P.O. Box 1247, Silver City, NM 88062 and we'll get a nice (WordPerfect) first generation copy with spiffy graphics and 60+ vintage photos out to you on a CD. Please be advised: we don't do MacIntosh and we're not crazy about MSWord. File conversions are your responsiblity.

IRRIGATION SYSTEMS IN THE MESILLA VALLEY, SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO: AN HISTORICAL OVERVIEW (3 vols). 1992.

ACEQUIA SYSTEMS OF THE RIO MIMBRES: FLOODWATER IRRIGATION IN SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO (2 vols). 1993

IRRIGATION IN THE WESTERN MARGINS OF THE PECOS: ACEQUIA SYSTEMS IN THE BONITO-RUIDOSO-PENASCO BASINS. 1994. NOTE: The Historic Preservation Division announced today (4/25/00) that this report has been reprinted for the first time in six years and is now available for $33.00. Call 505.827.6320 to obtain a copy!

ACEQUIA SYSTEMS OF THE VELARDE REGION: NORTH-CENTRAL NEW MEXICO (2 vols) 1994. NOTE: The Historic Preservation Division announced today (4/25/00)that this report has been reprinted for the first time in six years. Volume 1 is now available for $35.00, while Volume 2 is available for $14.00. Call 505.827.6320 to obtain a copy!

HISTORIC AND MODERN IRRIGATION SYSTEMS IN EL PASO, TEXAS (2 vols). 1994.

THE DEVELOPMENT OF IRRIGATION SYSTEMS IN THE MIDDLE RIO GRANDE CONSERVANCY DISTRICT, CENTRAL NEW MEXICO: A HISTORICAL OVERVIEW (2 vols). 1995.


NOW AVAILABLE ON CD FOR $10.00. . .CHEAP!

A REVIEW OF THE HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE OF AND MANAGEMENT RECOMMENTATIONS FOR PRESERVING NEW MEXICO'S ACEQUIA SYSTEMS (1 vol) 1996.

We occasionally blather a bit about water problems. Our thanks to Neal Schaeffer of the New Mexico Environment Department for believing that historical precedents and solutions might have relevence to contemporary water users.

Modern-day community acequias, even those inhabited largely by gringos, continue to rely on Spanish terms for many of their day-to-day activities. For a quick list of some of the more common terms, you may want to examine our glossary.

Apparently some folks think that we do really good bibliographies, about New Mexico acequias. And a tip of the hat to Dr. William Doolittle of UT Austin for uploading our material!

A comprehensive index of data regarding all of New Mexico's 1,900 acequias (historic and modern) is hard to find. However, if you wish you can review our very best effort to compile such an index. This is a BIG file and takes a while to load, so please be patient. Be sure to note the caveat!

For a more local perspective on issues regarding New Mexico's acequia systems, you may wish to visit the La Jicarita regional newsletter.

Return to the Home Page